Sere 100.2 military

Create or request a New Account using a method below:. (i.e. Family Members, Dependents, Contractors w/o JKO Accounts). -The USG routinely intercepts and monitors communications on this IS for purposes including, but not limited to, penetration testing, COMSEC monitoring, network operations and defense, personnel misconduct (PM), law enforcement (LE), and counterintelligence (CI) investigations. Existing Account holders - No CAC reader? Do you want to create a Password to access JKO at home?. By using this IS (which includes any device attached to this IS), you consent to the following conditions:. JKO Help Desk: 24 hours a day, 7 days a week excluding Federal Holidays. You are accessing a U.S. Government (USG) Information System (IS) that is provided for USG-authorized use only. JKO will be down 0700-1100 ET Wednesday April 24, 2019 to perform a new software release - Build 9.4. - I DO NOT have a CAC. (Which link do I use?). -Notwithstanding the above, using this IS does not constitute consent to PM, LE or CI investigative searching or monitoring of the content of privileged communications, or work product, related to personal representation or services by attorneys, psychotherapists, or clergy, and their assistants. Such communications and work product are private and confidential. See User Agreement for details. -At any time, the USG may inspect and seize data stored on this IS. -Communications using, or data stored on, this IS are not private, are subject to routine monitoring, interception, and search, and may be disclosed or used for any USG- authorized purpose. [ASKDEEIPSNPPET-21-23] Pilots of the day had little interest in passengers or cargo of any kind. Their attention was directed to flying the glider. The 88 th became concerned when pilots were reporting puzzling problems, especially in taking off, and in having to trim the airplanes unduly in flight. What was amiss was that loads were changing the center of gravity of the airplanes, or were heavier than the load for which the aircraft was rated. We had received no cautionary advice from the pilots on how to distribute loads. With little help from the Air Corps, the 88 th devised loading plans taking into consideration the center of gravity. Identify elements of Article II of the Code of Conduct. A/ETBs can be jumped over the rear ramp or side jump doors of high-performance aircraft like the Lockheed Martin C-130 Hercules and Alenia C-27J Spartan and even through the super-large side jump doors of the C-17 Globemaster III. . PARATROOPER 2000 on All Terrain Bike (ATB): the future of war is AIRBORNE, not seaborne. Identify some posture and resistance constants of an effective resistance posture. WW2 Mystery: U.S. Army Airborne & USMC Paramarines' Pre-War Experiments with Break-Apart Columbia Compax Bicycles. Which evasion aids can assist you with making contact with the local population?. Paratrooper cycles at 10 - 25 mph across battlefield. There was little, if any, experience available with respect to the loading of equipment into airplanes, and the problems such activities entailed. Nor did the 88 th get guidance from any source with such knowledge. What was achieved was achieved through dangerous, difficult, practical experience and the ingenuity and ability of the members of the 88 th to overcome the problems that developed. Colonel Mrazek commanded a battalion in the 326 th Glider Infantry Regiment in the 13 th during World War II and towards the end of the war commanded the regiment for several months. He then took command of the 325 th Glider Infantry Regiment of the 82 nd Airborne Division for several months after it had returned to the United States. PKO. AIRBORNE WARFARE not just logistics base seizure; they do not have to "seize and hold" WWII-style. The days of piling supplies on the beach for an enemy to cream a bloated marine force are over; the Russians know this, we do not--as we insist on wasting BILLIONS on land-locked, slow-to-deploy, sea-based gyrene units that once ashore foot-slog and truck-hop into enemy land mines. It was customary to equip each military airplane and glider passenger with a parachute. This was OK for airplanes, but when it came to gliders Lieutenant Al Leonard, one of the primary contributors to airborne techniques, considered the expendability doctrine inherent in air transport combat operations and questioned the advisability of issuing parachutes to passengers in gliders. Al reasoned that gliders normally were towed at about 300-500 feet altitude, too low to use parachutes if the occasion demanded. Moreover, weight was always a problem. If chutes could be dispensed with, equivalent weight in weapons and ammunition could be substituted. Al's argument carried the day, and glidermen ceased to wear parachutes, a condition that convinced paratroopers they never wanted to go into combat in a glider. The air force later adopted the practice of not issuing parachutes to passengers in transport aircraft. [EDITOR: WRONG: not true. Only of late has the USAF wimped out and stopped using common sense.]. As if we need yet more proof that ad hocery results in good ideas that could gain us a tactical advantage falling by the wayside; consider the U.S. military's failure t 1.Military members are never authorized to surrender 2.During military operations outside declared hostilities you may delay contact with local authorities. Shortly after take off, early production CG-4As dropped their wheels, and landed on sTEENs that ran part of the length of the fuselage. For the gliders to take off again, crews had a real chore to raise the glider and reinstall the wheels. There were other difficulties that (d)evolved from the sTEENs too numerous to mention here. Al Leonard cited them and suggested that landings be made on wheels. The Air Corps adopted his suggestion. Problems evaporated. Gliders suffered less landing damage, and changed from being expendable to recoverable. The world moves by the speed of the air, not a " slow boat to China ". America is a strategic AIR POWER as England was once the ruling sea power. U.S. Airborne forces must be able to rapidly converge on the enemy's most critical center of gravity by AIR power in order to gain strategic and operational surprise; as proven in Grenada, Panama and Haiti. Air POWER is not to be confused with air STRIKES as is vogue in the USAF. Our loss of Pristina airport to the Russian Airborne in a permissive motor march in Kosovo is a perfect example of the weakness of having to wait for marine peacekeepers driving long distances overland (from Greece!!!) to inland areas better reached by air-delivered forces. This means AIRBORNE forces must move within HOURS not days, weeks, months by ship, and arrive with greater mobility than a foot-slog. These forces conduct. (Images-negatives owned by 1 st TSG (A) donated to the U.S. Army; re: Infantry magazine, January-February, 1995). Not recorded in them, or elsewhere, are its contributions and the impact these contributions have made to airborne warfare operations and doctrine, to military and commercial airlift operations, to military helicopter operations or to the progress of America, especially through the aircraft industry. The 88 th trained the glider infantry regiments, artillery, medical and other battalions and many of the parachute elements of the 82 nd, 101 st, 11 th, 17 th divisions in air transport operations. After the 88 th was absorbed by the 326 th Glider Infantry Regiment in the 13 th Airborne Division, members of the former 88 th that were then in the 326 th also were selected to train the 84 th Infantry division for air transportably. From the 88 th evolved the information that was to become the basis of airborne operations, training and doctrine manuals. "All men dream: but not equally. Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find that it was vanity: but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act out their dream with open eyes, to make it possible.". At its activation as the 88 th Airborne Battalion on 10 October, 1942, it was intended to be an experimental organization that would introduce the air landing aspects of airborne warfare to America's military forces. Such warfare had been applied by the Germans against the Belgians early during World War II with devastating affect. Germany was able to keep information about these operations from leaking out of Germany.